2nd Grade Minions!

IMG_5472Supplies:
Yellow tempura paint, fat brushes
Black Sharpie marker
Silver Metallic Sharpie marker
Extra large wiggly eyes
Thick drawing paper
Silver & red washable metallic tempura paint (background)

To start, I had the kids place their wiggly eyes on the paper.  Then, we did a directed drawing lesson around the eyes.  A minion is really just a big bean shape.

Before adding paint, make sure to finish any detail with the Sharpie markers, including coloring in the goggles with Silver Metallic.  We painted the blue overalls and background first, as those paints were thinner and dried faster.  Last, the kids added yellow paint.  I took a chance and didn’t use washable, as the color isn’t as rich.

Feb 14 - Minions in the hallwayWe did these in February.  All lined up, they made a great Valentine for the kids’ teacher.  A couple of kids who finished first made the sign – complete with Minion duct tape as a border – and all of the kids signed it.
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Soggy Doggies

Really fun watercolor dogs by some very imaginative 1st graders!

Supplies
Watercolor Paper (12×18, cut in half because I was running out!)
Oval noses pre-cut from an adhesive foam sheet
Bone template (Google search), printed on cardstock
Black Sharpie markers
Washable markers
Brushes, tubs of water, paper towels
Scissors

Getting Started
Each child started with paper, a Sharpie and (3) noses.

I asked that they make at least one dog in the middle of their strip.  The rest was up to them.  We walked about how the nose and mouth could also be a bunny or a mouse, depending on the ear shape.  Long whiskers would make it cat-like.

The room grew loud quickly because all 25 kids were so excited about which dogs they’d draw and what they would name them!

Watercolor Effect
They had the option of brushing water onto their artwork to make the washable marker bleed.  Not everyone wanted to (which was fine) but most did, at least for the background.

Dog Bone
I really just printed these to give the kids who finished early something to do (cut them out).  But by suggesting they use them for a title, or to write their dogs’ names – well, creativity unleashed!

The impetus for this project, by the way, was the kids’ song, “Chihuahua.”  I’m a Zumbatomic® instructor, and when I asked my son if he had an idea for this lesson, he said, “Make a chihuahua and do the dance.”  Well, of course!

We didn’t get to the dance (search “Chihuahua dance” on YouTube), but that or the Skippyjon Jones books would be a fun accompaniment.

LOVE these!

Painted Piggies – 1st Grade

Supplies
black Sharpie markers
cardboard circle templates (cut from cereal boxes, etc)
12×18 white sulphite construction paper
pink, white and black tempura paint
glitter tempura paint (Lakeshore Learning brand not recommended)
small round brushes
fat round brushes

25 1st graders and paint is an ambitious combo for a one-class Art Parent lesson.  But they hardly ever get to paint!  So I forged ahead.

Drawing pigs is easy.
Tracing a template for the head ensures big pigs and a good start for everyone.  Then, they moved their circles down a bit to draw an oval body around the template.  “Arms,” legs, ears, eyes and a snout were easy for them.  I reminded them – no details – because they’d be painting over everything with a fat brush.

Mistake #1 – The kids wrote their names on the back of the paper with their Sharpies.  I should have had them sign the front.  Later, when they added paint, some of the signatures showed through.

Painting and mixing tints successful, too.
Palettes on the tables had only pink and white, at first.  Pure pink for all but the snout, hands and feet.  Then, mix in white for the snout.  Not everyone ended up with two distinct pinks, but the mixing experience is good!  Then, everyone got a bit of black to make grey for the hands and feet.

Oops – no tails!

Mistake #2
I had told the children not to draw a tail with marker.  I thought a curly tail with a swoosh of the paintbrush would be easiest – they could outline it later.  But I forgot to remind them when they were painting their pigs!  So out came more pink paint and just-washed brushes.

Outlining with black paint okay (for most).
Ideally, the pigs would’ve been left to dry at this point.  But an Art Parent lesson is done in just one class, so I handed out skinny brushes and black paint for outlining, and hoped for the best.  It’s a great exercise for developing fine motor skills, but challenging for this age group.

Backgrounds
Glitter paint is awesome, and I wanted the kids to be able to choose a fun color for their backgrounds.  We squirted the paint directly on to their papers, encouraging them to leave a bubble around their pigs, so as not to smear the still-wet black paint.

Mistake #3
I used Lakeshore Learning glitter paint that I already had, but knew was crummy (weird, “gross” consistency).  Try ArtMinds at Michaels, instead.

Still, these are mighty cute pigs.
Why pigs?  It was 60 degrees, so I scrapped the snowman project I had planned.  And my son wanted to teach his friends our “Shake Your Piggy Bank” dance, one of his favorites from my kids’ Zumba® playlist.

Finally, we read one of Mo Willems’ Piggie and Elephant books, Elephants Cannot Dance!

4 Little Indians

$1 Native American wooden picture frames from Jo-Ann.  I can’t wait to take these out every year!

They make great Thanksgiving place settings and a fun family or classroom activity.  We used feathers, glitter glue, colored Sharpies, sequins and adhesive gems.

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“I Wanna Wash My Haaaands!”

These kindergartener-made polar bears are adorable.  But applying paint with marshmallow “stamps?”  Not quite the hit I expected it to be!

The original lesson comes from Kids Artists (tagged for slightly older children) and I adapted it to suit our 30-minute time frame.

My son and 18 of his classmates traced a paper plate with pencil on blue 12-x18 paper for the bear’s face.  Then added half-circle ears.  They used a big marshmallow to add white tempura paint for fur, and a mini-marshmallow to add snow.  Eyes and a mouth were made with a small brush (they were so relieved!) and black tempura paint.

With no time for the white paint to dry, I thought they’d be disappointed in how a big, black painted nose would turn out.  So they stuck on pre-cut noses made from sparkly adhesive-backed foam (love that stuff!).

A few children were interested in making grey, which I showed them individually so they could add depth to the insides of the ears and under the bear’s chin.  But most were desperate to wash their hands!

The biggest hit of this project?  Eating marshmallows once everyone’s hands were clean and reading aloud The Marshmallow Incident.

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