2nd Grade Minions!

IMG_5472Supplies:
Yellow tempura paint, fat brushes
Black Sharpie marker
Silver Metallic Sharpie marker
Extra large wiggly eyes
Thick drawing paper
Silver & red washable metallic tempura paint (background)

To start, I had the kids place their wiggly eyes on the paper.  Then, we did a directed drawing lesson around the eyes.  A minion is really just a big bean shape.

Before adding paint, make sure to finish any detail with the Sharpie markers, including coloring in the goggles with Silver Metallic.  We painted the blue overalls and background first, as those paints were thinner and dried faster.  Last, the kids added yellow paint.  I took a chance and didn’t use washable, as the color isn’t as rich.

Feb 14 - Minions in the hallwayWe did these in February.  All lined up, they made a great Valentine for the kids’ teacher.  A couple of kids who finished first made the sign – complete with Minion duct tape as a border – and all of the kids signed it.
IMG_5483 IMG_5482 IMG_5481 IMG_5480 IMG_5479 IMG_5478 IMG_5476 IMG_5474 IMG_5473 IMG_5471 IMG_5469 IMG_5458

Soggy Doggies

Really fun watercolor dogs by some very imaginative 1st graders!

Supplies
Watercolor Paper (12×18, cut in half because I was running out!)
Oval noses pre-cut from an adhesive foam sheet
Bone template (Google search), printed on cardstock
Black Sharpie markers
Washable markers
Brushes, tubs of water, paper towels
Scissors

Getting Started
Each child started with paper, a Sharpie and (3) noses.

I asked that they make at least one dog in the middle of their strip.  The rest was up to them.  We walked about how the nose and mouth could also be a bunny or a mouse, depending on the ear shape.  Long whiskers would make it cat-like.

The room grew loud quickly because all 25 kids were so excited about which dogs they’d draw and what they would name them!

Watercolor Effect
They had the option of brushing water onto their artwork to make the washable marker bleed.  Not everyone wanted to (which was fine) but most did, at least for the background.

Dog Bone
I really just printed these to give the kids who finished early something to do (cut them out).  But by suggesting they use them for a title, or to write their dogs’ names – well, creativity unleashed!

The impetus for this project, by the way, was the kids’ song, “Chihuahua.”  I’m a Zumbatomic® instructor, and when I asked my son if he had an idea for this lesson, he said, “Make a chihuahua and do the dance.”  Well, of course!

We didn’t get to the dance (search “Chihuahua dance” on YouTube), but that or the Skippyjon Jones books would be a fun accompaniment.

LOVE these!

“I Wanna Wash My Haaaands!”

These kindergartener-made polar bears are adorable.  But applying paint with marshmallow “stamps?”  Not quite the hit I expected it to be!

The original lesson comes from Kids Artists (tagged for slightly older children) and I adapted it to suit our 30-minute time frame.

My son and 18 of his classmates traced a paper plate with pencil on blue 12-x18 paper for the bear’s face.  Then added half-circle ears.  They used a big marshmallow to add white tempura paint for fur, and a mini-marshmallow to add snow.  Eyes and a mouth were made with a small brush (they were so relieved!) and black tempura paint.

With no time for the white paint to dry, I thought they’d be disappointed in how a big, black painted nose would turn out.  So they stuck on pre-cut noses made from sparkly adhesive-backed foam (love that stuff!).

A few children were interested in making grey, which I showed them individually so they could add depth to the insides of the ears and under the bear’s chin.  But most were desperate to wash their hands!

The biggest hit of this project?  Eating marshmallows once everyone’s hands were clean and reading aloud The Marshmallow Incident.

IMG_0365 IMG_0361 IMG_0359 IMG_0358 IMG_0357 IMG_0356 IMG_0355 IMG_0354IMG_0366

2nd Grade American Gothic

Art Parent sample

Famous artwork? Check.  Showcase for children’s creativity? Check.  Popular culture?  Fun?  Low prep for busy Art Parent in December? Check, check, check.  MaryAnn Kohl’s “Gothic Paste-Up” lesson in Great American Artists for Kids may just be the perfect art lesson.

Inspired by Ms. Kohl, 23 second-graders and I immersed ourselves in Grant Wood’s iconic work, American Gothic, yesterday.  A photograph of the actual house Wood used as a model for his painting is downloadable for free here.

Lesson Explanation to take home

Lesson Explanation to take home

I brought in one photo per student that was pre-mounted on black paper with an explanation of the lesson on the back.  Before the children went to work on their figures, we read portions of Grant Wood (Getting To Know the World’s Greatest Artists), defined parody and looked at examples of American Gothic parodies.

Our Favorite Grant Wood Facts
1. As a child, he drew pictures with burnt sticks that his mother gave him from their wood stove.
2. His job during World War II was to paint camouflage on the tanks.
3. The models for the figures in American Gothic were the artist’s sister and their family dentist.

As the children worked, I encouraged them to think of a title for their art (“______ American Gothic”), which they added, along with their signatures, to the black  frames with Sharpie Metallic markers.  Once finished, each child received a box of Newman’s Own raisins (the Newman’s Own logo is an American Gothic parody) and scratch paper for doodling with a stick, as Grant Wood did as a child.

Check out their masterpieces below.  Had the two figures in Grant Wood’s original painting seen these, they’d certainly be smiling!
Puppies American GothicSnowman & Girl American GothicGumball American Gothic Tangled American Gothic

Grem & Acer American GothicJunk Food People American GothicLadybugs American GothicNight of the Living Donut American GothicToy Story American GothicWinter American GothicBest Friends American GothicTurtle American GothicWebkinz American GothicElves American GothicNorth Pole American Gothic

Native American Portraits (by 5 and 6-Year-Olds!)

19 kindergarteners were so proud today when they made these Native American Indian Portraits, based on a drawing in Ed Emberley’s Drawing Book of Faces.

Ed Emberley’s books are a wonderful way to approach drawing with young children.  He breaks down all of the things that kids like to make – faces, animals, fire trucks – into basic lines and shapes, making drawing fun and giving kids lots of confidence.

Lines & Shapes ArtLines & Shapes IndianI showed the kids these shapes and lines and asked them what they saw.  Thought I was being cute when I wondered out loud if anyone could see a Native American face.  When several of them said, “Yes!” it kind of messed up my big reveal :) – this guy I’d made on a Word document just using the shapes toolbar:

Anyway, the kids started with an 11×15 piece of watercolor paper, a black Sharpie and a rectangle cardboard template for the face, just to give them a starting point for size.  They followed a directed drawing lesson (step-by-step instructions with me drawing at the same time), and then colored in the hair with their Sharpies.  Next step, they had fun with washable colored markers.  (Any washable marker will do, but my own children insist that Crayola Pip-Squeaks work best).

I encouraged them to keep their marks big and loose, reminding them that the colors would smear in the next step.
Step 1 - black Sharpie drawingStep 2 - Color in Hair with SharpieStep 3 - Color with washable markersStep 4 - Add water with brush

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, with a brush and water, they turned their drawings into beautiful watercolor art.  Each child had a brush and folded paper towel.  Their work was dry enough at the end of our 45 minutes to mount on black paper (12×18 trimmed for a frame).

Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Faces Art LessonAn explanation of the lesson was attached to the back of the frame and the kids added their names in silver metallic Sharpies.

A great art-themed companion book to this lesson would be When a Line Bends…A Shape Begins.

I am so pleased with these results, as were the young artists.  Thank you, Ed Emberley!Native American Watercolor #6Native American Watercolor #5Native American Watercolor #2Native American #1Native American Watercolor #3Native American Watercolor #2Native American Watercolor #8Native American Watercolor #18Native American Watercolor #18Native American Watercolor #11Native American Watercolor #10Native American Watercolor #4Native American Watercolor #7Native American Watercolor #13Native American Watercolor #14Native American Watercolor #17

Native American Watercolor #16